Chapter

Practical Reason, Law, and State

Neil MacCormick

in Practical Reason in Law and Morality

Published in print December 2008 | ISBN: 9780198268772
Published online May 2009 | e-ISBN: 9780191713071 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198268772.003.0012

Series: Law, State, and Practical Reason

 Practical Reason, Law, and State

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This chapter concludes, not only this book, but writings of pervious books, on ‘Law, State, and Practical Reason’. The philosophical scope of this writing has covered a general theory of law as ‘institutional normative order’, a discussion of sovereignty, statehood, and nationalism, an inquiry into legal reasoning as a discipline involving both logic and rhetoric, and finally in this book a study of practical reasoning in law and morality. The chapter ties up some remaining loose ends that connect the present work with its predecessors. These concern: universal and particular in moral judgement; the place of autonomy in moral reasoning; issues about ‘ natural law’; the virtues of the law-abiding person; the question of how to live; and the problem of life and death.

Keywords: Kant; moral judgements; moral autonomy; institutional law; moral reasoning; autonomy; natural law

Chapter.  9115 words. 

Subjects: Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law

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