Chapter

Growth, Conflict, and Canadianization in the British Era (1800–67)

Robert T. Handy

in A History of the Churches in the United States and Canada

Published in print January 1976 | ISBN: 9780198269106
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191683572 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198269106.003.0009

Series: Oxford History of the Christian Church

Growth, Conflict, and Canadianization in the British Era (1800–67)

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The growth of the British provinces and their churches was often companied by competition and conflict. The tensions in Canadian life, most of which had a religious component and some of which centred on religion, came from many complex sources. The churches were in various stages of developing their own national organizations as Confederation was achieved, and hence the patterns of their ‘Canadianization’ varied considerably in detail. In particular, the growth and consolidation in the Atlantic colonies are demonstrated. It also addresses the conflict in the Canadas. In addition, it explains the church reorganization in Canada East and Canada West, the challenge of the West, and the churches and Confederation. An attempt to compare the Christianity of the two North American lands in the mid-19th century throws up many subtle difficulties, for in certain ways the Canada of 1867 at the beginning of Confederation was parallel with the United States at 1789 as its Federal Union was formed. The differences between the religious styles and structures of the two North American nations are evident, yet the similarities and parallels must not be minimized.

Keywords: Christianity; Canadianization; British provinces; Canada; British era; conflict; growth; Confederation; Atlantic colonies

Chapter.  14262 words. 

Subjects: History of Christianity

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