Chapter

St David’s College, Lampeter

David Dowland

in Nineteenth-Century Anglican Theological Training

Published in print September 1997 | ISBN: 9780198269298
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191683589 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198269298.003.0011

Series: Oxford Theological Monographs

St David’s College, Lampeter

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In 1803, Thomas Burgess was enthroned at St David's where he was perceived as another indifferent English bishop. However, this chapter discusses the dedication and the passion of Thomas Burgess in providing a quality Anglican theological training and education in the impoverished see of St David's. From being a relatively unknown college in Wales, the St David's College became a Welsh substitute for the universities of Oxford and Cambridge wherein eventually, the College gained affiliation to Oxford University. The chapter also discusses the many issues and problems surrounding the College such as the increasing number of competitors, the failure to create prestige in their degrees and courses, and issues with administration and governance. One of the most striking features of the College is that while the College was originally intended for the impoverished members of the diocese of St David's, the College was predominantly governed by Oxford and Cambridge graduates — an indicator that while efforts had been made to elevate the status of local colleges, the prestige and dominance of the deemed superior universities continued to thrive and limit the capabilities of lesser-known colleges.

Keywords: Thomas Burgess; bishop; Anglican theological training; St David's College; Oxford University; Wales; competitors; prestige

Chapter.  10234 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: History of Christianity

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