Chapter

Thomas Kelly and John Walker, and the Revival of Apostolic’ Practices within Irish Evangelicalism

Grayson Carter

in Anglican Evangelicals

Published in print February 2001 | ISBN: 9780198270089
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191683886 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198270089.003.0004

Series: Oxford Theological Monographs

Thomas Kelly and John Walker, and the Revival of Apostolic’ Practices within Irish Evangelicalism

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At the outset of the nineteenth century, Evangelicalism was in the ascendant: it was fast stabilizing and consolidating, less prone to extreme forms of speculative Calvinism. However, a small number of ‘irregular’ and doctrinally extreme ‘Gospel clergymen’ remained on the scene, keeping within the bounds of the Establishment, but ministering outside its normal confines and conventions. In Dublin, a revival of so-called ‘apostolic’ practices occurred around 1803, accompanied by determined separatism, anti-Erastianism, anti-clericalism, and high Calvinism. This movement quickly led to the secessions of two of the most prominent Irish Evangelicals from the Church of Ireland, as well as to the creation of two new religious ‘connexions’ that rivalled — and often vehemently opposed — both the Anglican Establishment and one another. This chapter examines the ethos of this Irish revival and its repercussions on Anglicanism on both sides of the Irish Sea. It also focuses on the events leading up to the formal secession of Thomas Kelly and John Walker from the Established Church.

Keywords: Evangelicalism; Thomas Kelly; John Walker; clergymen; separatism; anti-Erastianism; secession; Calvisnim; Anglicanism; Church of Ireland

Chapter.  19289 words. 

Subjects: Christianity

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