Chapter

Evangelicals and Tractarians: Baptist Noel and the Evangelical Response to the Gorham Affair

Grayson Carter

in Anglican Evangelicals

Published in print February 2001 | ISBN: 9780198270089
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191683886 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198270089.003.0009

Series: Oxford Theological Monographs

Evangelicals and Tractarians: Baptist Noel and the Evangelical Response to the Gorham Affair

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The 1840s rank as one of the most embattled periods in modern Anglican history. It was characterized by a succession of highly disturbing issues: the imprisonment of James Shore in 1844, John Henry Newman's secession to Rome in 1845, the Maynooth crisis in the same year, and the long drawn-out Gorham affair. In Scotland, the explosive Disruption of 1843 showed a reformed and established Church of England faced by an acute crisis over the issue of lay ‘intrusion’. This led to the secession from Kirk of Thomas Chalmers, the great exponent of Church establishment, and provided Evangelicals south of the border with a painful example of the dangers inherent in Erastianism. In the first three decades of the nineteenth century pastoral optimism had, on the whole, characterized Evangelicalism. Hon. and Revd Baptist Noel's secession in 1848 was a severe blow to Evangelical hopes. In the final days of 1848, Noel published Essay on the Union of Church and State, which dealt with the principles of the union of church and state.

Keywords: James Shore; John Henry Newman; secession; Evangelicals; Maynooth crisis; Gorham affair; Scotland; Baptist Noel; Church of England; Erastianism

Chapter.  18247 words. 

Subjects: Christianity

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