Chapter

Reformation Legacy: Catholic Buildings and Protestant Worship

Nigel Yates

in Buildings, Faith, and Worship

Published in print July 1993 | ISBN: 9780198270133
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191683916 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198270133.003.0003

Series: Buildings, Faith, and Worship

Reformation Legacy: Catholic Buildings and Protestant Worship

Show Summary Details

Preview

The inevitable consequence of the Reformation in those parts of Europe where reform was carried out as a matter of state policy was that the existing churches had to be adapted to new liturgical requirements. In the short term, of course, many of the clergy and congregations of the new Reformed Churches were identical to those that had worshipped in the same church buildings as Catholics. Although the new forms of service enacted by statute were observed in most churches, other aspects of liturgical change, particularly in relation to church furnishings, occurred more slowly. On the whole, it was the towns where reform was carried out most quickly, and isolated rural areas where there was the most resistance to change. In parts of Wales, Catholic practices survived until the end of the 16th century.

Keywords: Reformation; clergy; Reformed Churches; Europe; congregations; church buildings; church furnishings; liturgical change

Chapter.  9719 words. 

Subjects: History of Christianity

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.