Chapter

The Anglican Liturgical Tradition

Nigel Yates

in Buildings, Faith, and Worship

Published in print July 1993 | ISBN: 9780198270133
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191683916 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198270133.003.0005

Series: Buildings, Faith, and Worship

The Anglican Liturgical Tradition

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The restoration of the Anglican episcopate after 1660 did not lead wholly to a restoration of the liturgical arrangements favoured by the Laudian clergy, at least in the long term. Whilst such arrangements were generally popular for much of the late 17th and early 18th centuries, a number of interesting liturgical experiments were being made within a generation of the episcopate being restored and these had begun to gather pace by the middle of the 18th century. However, the conservative tradition within Anglicanism was very strong and continued to influence the Anglican Church's liturgical tradition right up to the early 19th century. There is, however, good reason to believe that what has survived is in fact somewhat unrepresentative if compared with other evidence, notably the surviving plans or illustrations of buildings that have been subsequently altered. This chapter divides and further discusses the three broad general categories of Anglican church buildings from 1660–1840.

Keywords: restoration; Anglican episcopate; Anglicanism; liturgical tradition; Anglican Church; clergy; church buildings; liturgical experiments

Chapter.  4642 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: History of Christianity

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