Chapter

The Liturgical Impact of the Oxford Movement

Nigel Yates

in Buildings, Faith, and Worship

Published in print July 1993 | ISBN: 9780198270133
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191683916 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198270133.003.0008

Series: Buildings, Faith, and Worship

The Liturgical Impact of the Oxford Movement

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The liturgical revolution of the second half of the 19th century was the most violent the Church of England had experienced since the Reformation. Not all of this was attributable to the Oxford Movement, in its origins a small and obscurantist pressure group whose theological outlook was profoundly conservative. However, the movement unleashed other forces within both Church and nation anxious to break away from what they regarded as the mundaneness of official religion in England over the previous century and a half. Some were theological radicals anxious to take the rationalism of the 18th-century Church one stage further. Some were political radicals who wanted to reform the Church. Some were romantics who wanted the Church to return to the perceived orthodoxy of the Caroline divines or the ceremonial splendour of the Middle Ages. All these pressure groups vied with each other for power over the Church of England after 1820, and all could count their successes.

Keywords: liturgical revolution; Church of England; Oxford Movement; pressure group; theological radicals; political radicals; romantics; England

Chapter.  10468 words. 

Subjects: History of Christianity

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