Chapter

Cranmer’s Medieval Inheritance: Contrition as Repentance

Ashley Null

in Thomas Cranmer’s Doctrine of Repentance

Published in print April 2001 | ISBN: 9780198270218
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191683954 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198270218.003.0002
Cranmer’s Medieval Inheritance: Contrition as Repentance

Show Summary Details

Preview

Thomas Cranmer was originally baptized into Catholicism in line with the beliefs in Western Christian teaching. In his youth, Cranmer was exposed to the penitential teaching in the English church through publications that illustrated the penitential doctrine held by educated clergy. Poenitentia or penance as self punishment is both a virtue and one of the seven sacraments of the church. Contrition is not without the said sacrament since there will always be an intention to confess sins. Penitential dolor or grief could be either attrition, sorrow from fear of punishment, or contrition, detesting sin for offending God. As a sacrament, confession was used by the pre-Reformation English church to teach sinners about the need for dependence on God.

Keywords: Catholicism; English church; sinner; penance; virtue; sacrament; contrition; confession; God

Chapter.  15946 words. 

Subjects: Christianity

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.