Chapter

Influx Control and African Urbanisation

Deborah Posel

in The Making of Apartheid 1948–1961

Published in print December 1991 | ISBN: 9780198273349
Published online October 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191684036 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198273349.003.0008

Series: Oxford Studies in African Affairs

Influx Control and African Urbanisation

Show Summary Details

Preview

This chapter discusses the failed attempts of the Native Affairs Department (NAD) to curb African urbanisation. It examines why the settled urban African communities in ‘white’ areas continued to expand during the 1950s, despite influx control barriers. It explores the impact within the state of mass protests against passes for women, in order to explain why until late in the decade, African women enjoyed greater freedom of movement than African men. It also assesses the extent to which the Urban Areas Act provided a protected avenue into the townships for originally migrant men and women and their families. Finally, it considers the effects of unorganised African resistance to the influx control laws.

Keywords: Native Affairs Department; NAD; African urbanisation; African communities; influx control; Urban Areas Act

Chapter.  9470 words. 

Subjects: Comparative Politics

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.