Chapter

Victimization and Offending

Barry S. Godfrey, David J. Cox and Stephen D. Farrall

in Criminal Lives

Published in print April 2007 | ISBN: 9780199217205
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191696046 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199217205.003.0006

Series: Clarendon Studies in Criminology

Victimization and Offending

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This chapter explores the extent to which the 101 persistent offenders were also victims of crime. It is clear that persistent offenders were also more likely to have experienced victimization and also to have experienced more victimization episodes when compared to one-off offenders in the courts. However, it remained the case that only a rather small proportion of persistent offenders had experienced any victimization. It also appears that offending preceded victimization, which does not imply that somehow the offender was ‘asking for it’ or in any way ‘deserved’ the victimization that they experienced. Having a lifestyle that exposed them to various risks is one explanation. Another is appearing to have an aggressive nature. A third explanation, surrounding employment, also emerges. Some areas of the economy were more easily regulated by agents of the courts.

Keywords: persistent offenders; victimization; lifestyle; offending; employment

Chapter.  8258 words. 

Subjects: Criminal Law

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