Chapter

What Peace? British Blue Helmets in Bosnia

Nigel D. White

in Democracy goes to War

Published in print June 2009 | ISBN: 9780199218592
Published online September 2009 | e-ISBN: 9780191705595 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199218592.003.0007
 What Peace? British Blue Helmets in Bosnia

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After considering the development and nature of UN peacekeeping, this chapter focuses on the decision to deploy British troops to Bosnia in 1994–5. The government's decisions to contribute to the UN peacekeeping force (the ineptly named UN Protection Force: UNPROFOR) and to the enforcement of the no-fly zone in a NATO operation are analyzed in political and legal terms. The fact of there being UN authority and its effect on the decision to deploy British troops has to be considered alongside that of the absence of the legal and military conditions for peacekeeping. Was Parliament more willing to accept the decision to deploy British troops to Bosnia because UNPROFOR was seen as a UN-mandated consensual peacekeeping force? Was there any attempt made in Parliament to address the issue of ‘mission creep’ as UNPROFOR's mandate was changed by the Security Council in an attempt to address the deteriorating situation?

Keywords: principles of peacekeeping; impartiality; consent; limited use of force; UNPROFOR; type of conflict; Dayton agreement; state-building

Chapter.  12467 words. 

Subjects: Human Rights and Immigration

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