Chapter

The Enlightenment Problem and a Common Assumption

Jennifer Saul

in Simple Sentences, Substitution, and Intuitions

Published in print April 2007 | ISBN: 9780199219155
Published online May 2007 | e-ISBN: 9780191711848 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199219155.003.0004
 The Enlightenment Problem and a Common Assumption

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This chapter begins the diagnosis of The Enlightenment Problem. It argues that theorists have tended to proceed as if they adhere to a principle that this book terms Expressed or Implicated (EOI). EOI refers to an utterance of a sentence S in a context C, the truth conditional intuitions of competent, rational speakers who are relevantly well-informed must match the truth conditions of either what is (semantically) expressed or what is implicated by S in C. This chapter argues that EOI is false, and attempts to diagnose why it is that theorists have tended to proceed as though they accepted it.

Keywords: EOI; expressed; implicated; Enlightenment Problem; intuitions; truth conditions

Chapter.  10352 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy of Language

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