Chapter

XIII Freedom of Speech and the Internet

Eric Barendt

in Freedom of Speech

Second edition

Published in print March 2007 | ISBN: 9780199225811
XIII Freedom of Speech and the Internet

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This chapter examines the general treatment of the Internet under constitutional free speech principles, in particular whether it should, like the broadcasting media, be subject to a measure of special legal regulation. Another question is whether the Internet should be regarded as a public forum, with the result that limits on access to it in public libraries and universities would be incompatible with freedom of speech, in the absence of compelling reasons for denying access. There are now Supreme Court and other United States decisions on these points, which are considered in this chapter. The regulation of indecent material and child pornography and the application of obscenity laws to pornography are discussed, along with aspects of defamation or libel law, in particular the different treatment of Internet service providers under English and US law. Some of the legal questions posed by the global character of Internet speech are also considered.

Chapter.  24 pages.  12620 words. 

Subjects: Constitutional and Administrative Law ; Law

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