Chapter

War and its Resolutions 1775–1783

P. J. MARSHALL

in The Making and Unmaking of Empires

Published in print September 2007 | ISBN: 9780199226665
Published online January 2010 | e-ISBN: 9780191706813 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199226665.003.0012
War and its Resolutions 1775–1783

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What began as a conflict over ultimate authority in Britain's American colonies became a worldwide war, as France, Spain, and the Netherlands joined in against Britain. The French sent forces to America and intervened in wars which Britain was fighting with Indian states. British authority was also challenged in Ireland. The British Empire was severely strained and had to make major concessions. Above all, the war in America proved to be unwinnable, and the independence of the thirteen colonies had to be accepted. Full autonomy had to be conceded to Ireland. Canada and Jamaica were, however, defended, and challenges to Britain's position in India were fought off. The empire survived, soon to expand again.

Keywords: thirteen colonies; France; Spain; America; Ireland; Canada; Jamaica; British Empire

Chapter.  12782 words. 

Subjects: Early Modern History (1500 to 1700)

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