Chapter

The Absence of Contradiction and the Contradiction of Absence: Law, Ethics and the Holocaust

David M Seymour

in Law and Popular Culture

Published in print April 2005 | ISBN: 9780199272235
Published online March 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191699603 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199272235.003.0004

Series: Current Legal Issues

The Absence of Contradiction and the Contradiction of Absence: Law, Ethics and the Holocaust

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This chapter discusses Desmond Manderson's article From Hunger to Love: Myths of the Source, Interpretation, and Constitution of Law in Children's Literature. In his interpretation of Maurice Sendak's Where the Wild Things Are, Manderson offered a thesis that is grounded on the idea of the absence of ethics within modern law. He argued that this absence was brought about by the dominance of legal positivism that emphasizes obedience to the narrow meaning of the text at the expense of negotiation, responsibility, and context.

Keywords: Desmond Manderson; ethics; modern law; children's literature; legal positivism

Chapter.  6563 words. 

Subjects: Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law

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