Chapter

Ovid, Augustus, and the Politics of Moderation in <i>Ars Amatoria</i> 3

Roy K. Gibson

in The Art of Love

Published in print January 2007 | ISBN: 9780199277773
Published online January 2010 | e-ISBN: 9780191708138 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199277773.003.0007
Ovid, Augustus, and the Politics of Moderation in Ars Amatoria 3

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This chapter focuses on Ars 3, assessing the political implications of the praeceptor's advice of moderation in several aspects of women's lives. Instead of observing the traditional stereotypes that linked hairstyle, clothing, and use of cosmetics to either sexual purity or sexual promiscuity, Ovid advocates a principle of individual decorum; this Ovidian strategy can be felt to clash with Augustus's Leges Iuliae, which had reinforced the polar stereotypes for meretrix and matrona by requiring women to dress according to their sexual status.

Keywords: Ars Amatoria; love; meretrix; matrona; Augustus; politics; didactic; Rome

Chapter.  8349 words. 

Subjects: Classical Literature

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