Chapter

‘Egypt was taking strong action against the traffic in hashish’: ‘Loco-weed’, the League of Nations, and the British Empire, <i>c.</i>1928–<i>c.</i>1945

James H. Mills

in Cannabis Nation

Published in print November 2012 | ISBN: 9780199283422
Published online January 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780191746161 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199283422.003.0003
‘Egypt was taking strong action against the traffic in hashish’: ‘Loco-weed’, the League of Nations, and the British Empire, c.1928–c.1945

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Between 1928 and 1945 Britain's approach to the substance abroad was riddled with contradictions. On the one hand the issue of cannabis was kept alive at the League of Nations by Thomas Wentworth Russell Pasha, a colonial policeman who made his career in Egypt enforcing a prohibition on the drug. On the other hand, the British administration in India persisted in selling the substance to colleagues in Burma and the West Indies with an utter disregard for the restrictions imposed by the international drugs regulatory system. Chapter 3 explores the tangled relationships with cannabis of the British Empire in its final years. It shows how imperial administrators shaped the approach of the League of Nations to the drug and ensured that the inhabitants of many of the country's colonies lived in some of the world's most thriving markets for preparations of the plant.

Keywords: Empire; trade; League of Nations; India; Egypt; prohibition

Chapter.  11617 words. 

Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945)

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