Chapter

Rock ’n’ Roll Suicide Film

David E. James

in Rock 'N' Film

Published in print February 2016 | ISBN: 9780199387595
Published online December 2015 | e-ISBN: 9780199387632 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199387595.003.0018
Rock ’n’ Roll Suicide Film

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Literary Theory and Cultural Studies
  • Literary Studies (20th Century onwards)

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

By the early 1970s in the United Kingdom, the utopian hopes of biracial, Anglo‐American rock ’n’ roll were in disarray, and British studios of the glam rock era marketed narratives of rock ’n’ roll’s dystopian integration with corrupt business and political interests. Anticipated by Privilege (1967), Peter Watkins’s portrayal of rock culture as quasi‐fascist, these included two films starring David Essex that narrated the emergence and decline of English rock ’n’ roll: That’ll Be the Day (1973) and Stardust (1974). Meanwhile, D. A. Pennebaker made a documentary about the era’s most enigmatic performer, David Bowie; Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars (1973) seemed to exploit all the dire predictions about rock ’n’roll’s suicide, while paradoxically reasserting the communitarian bonds between performer and fans.

Keywords: glam rock; Privilege; Peter Watkins; David Essex; That’ll Be the Day; Stardust; D. A. Pennebaker; David Bowie

Chapter.  10989 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Literary Theory and Cultural Studies ; Literary Studies (20th Century onwards)

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content. subscribe or login to access all content.