Chapter

‘On the Internet, Nobody Knows You're a Nazi’: Some Comparative Legal Aspects of Holocaust Denial on the <i>WWW</i>

David Fraser

in Extreme Speech and Democracy

Published in print February 2009 | ISBN: 9780199548781
Published online May 2009 | e-ISBN: 9780191720673 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199548781.003.0026
 ‘On the Internet, Nobody Knows You're a Nazi’: Some Comparative Legal Aspects of Holocaust Denial on the WWW

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This chapter examines some legal responses to the dangerous phenomenon of Internet-based Holocaust Denial. Legal regulations in Canada and Australia provide two frameworks under which Holocaust Denial can be outlawed. Canada has chosen to proceed by way of complex analyses of the content of the ‘speech’ and its reception by an intended audience. Australia, conversely, has adopted a legal framework which examines the possible adverse impact of the ‘speech’ on an identified victim group. What unites the two, and the aspect which is perhaps most troubling from a variety of perspectives, is a distinct rejection of any claim that the Holocaust actually happened, as an underlying normative basis for legal regulation. The chapter concludes that a political decision that denial of the Shoah is a malum in se approach would be preferable.

Keywords: Holocaust Denial; Australia; Canada; Internet; Shoah

Chapter.  13531 words. 

Subjects: Human Rights and Immigration

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