Chapter

The Politics of Memory: Bans and Commemorations

Patrick Weil

in Extreme Speech and Democracy

Published in print February 2009 | ISBN: 9780199548781
Published online May 2009 | e-ISBN: 9780191720673 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199548781.003.0029
 The Politics of Memory: Bans and Commemorations

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This chapter shows that the French Republic has previously recognized slavery as crime against humanity and has adopted such radical bans and celebrations: in 1848, at the time of the permanent abolishment of slave trade and slavery; and in the 1880s, when the Republic was definitively put into place as France's form of government. Examining the circumstances in which these institutionalizations took place provides an understanding of the more recent laws in a historical context.

Keywords: France; slavery; freedom of speech; genocide; Jews

Chapter.  8808 words. 

Subjects: Human Rights and Immigration

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