Chapter

Money, Men, and Mayhem: Electoral Politics before the First World War

Jon Lawrence

in Electing Our Masters

Published in print March 2009 | ISBN: 9780199550128
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191701528 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199550128.003.0004
Money, Men, and Mayhem: Electoral Politics before the First World War

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  • Modern History (1700 to 1945)
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This chapter discusses electoral politics before the First World War. The first section describes the triumph of populism. Edwardian elections were more fiercely fought, more disorderly, and more shamelessly populist than those of either the late Victorian or the inter-war era. Meanwhile, Liberal heavyweights such as Lloyd George, Churchill, and Asquith showed themselves to be supreme masters of this new uncompromising mass politics. The second section looks at the role of women in electioneering. The most important development in late 19th-century politics was the growing prominence of women as active and independent political campaigners. The third section examines the politics of the crowd. It notes a broad range of voices proclaiming the need to reform Britain's electoral culture on the eve of the First World War. The last section discusses the continuing influence of money and class in electoral politics.

Keywords: money; class; populism; women campaigners; First World War; crowd

Chapter.  9408 words. 

Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945) ; Political History

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