Chapter

Individual and environmental interventions to prevent obesity in African American children and adolescents

Portia Jackson, Jammie Hopkins and Toni Yancey

in Childhood Obesity Prevention

Published in print September 2010 | ISBN: 9780199572915
Published online January 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191595110 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199572915.003.0029
Individual and environmental interventions to prevent obesity in African American children and adolescents

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African-American children and adolescents are at high risk for obesity, physical inactivity, poor nutrition, and related co-morbidities. According to data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III (1988–94) and NHANES 2003–4, the prevalence of obesity among African-American adolescents nearly doubled during those two decades, among the highest increases of any ethnic group. There are gender differences in obesity, weight gain and fat accumulation with sexual maturation, with rates of growth in obesity 20% higher among girls than boys. The well-documented decline in physical activity during adolescence is also more striking in girls than boys, and in black girls than white girls — in one study, a 100% vs 64% decrease, respectively, between ages 9 and 18 years. This chapter discusses trends in these variables as well as the influence of the physical environment, body image, and outcomes from various interventions among African-American children.

Keywords: children; intervention; eating; health promotion; physical activity; African American; race; culture; USA

Chapter.  8375 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology

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