Chapter

‘The Serbian Conspiracy’ and ‘Bulgarian Agitation’: The Serbo‐Turkish War and the Revolt of Public Opinion

Miloš Ković

in Disraeli and the Eastern Question

Published in print November 2010 | ISBN: 9780199574605
Published online January 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191595134 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199574605.003.0006
‘The Serbian Conspiracy’ and ‘Bulgarian Agitation’: The Serbo‐Turkish War and the Revolt of Public Opinion

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Disraeli's position was weakened by the entry of Serbia and Montenegro into the war against the Ottoman Empire, and especially by the Bulgarian atrocities and the start of the Bulgarian agitation. The resistance of public opinion tied his hands and prevented him from pursuing policies based on decisive moves and sabre‐rattling. Although a significant proportion of public opinion believed that Disraeli was prepared to go to war in the interests of the Ottoman Empire, he was also prepared to take part in its division, provided that Britain's prestige remained intact and that it be given possession of Constantinople together with some other strongholds. The Bulgarian agitation shook him, yet every time that he yielded ground he tried to cover this up with provocative speeches. At the same time, Russia's support for Serbia and Montenegro and her public interest in Bulgaria convinced him that she was his main opponent.

Keywords: Serbia; Montenegro; Serbo‐Turkish war; Bulgaria; Bulgarian atrocities; Bulgarian agitation; public opinion; Constantinople

Chapter.  22902 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945)

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