Chapter

Memory and Experience

Hester Barron

in The 1926 Miners' Lockout

Published in print November 2009 | ISBN: 9780199575046
Published online February 2010 | e-ISBN: 9780191722196 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199575046.003.0007

Series: Oxford Historical Monographs

Memory and Experience

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This chapter explores the way in which the 1926 strike was remembered by those who lived through it, both in the romanticized story passed down in collective memory, and in the more diverse memories of individuals, differentiated by age, gender, and personal circumstances. It then considers the way in which a certain view of the past became important during the strike itself, when memory was able to build solidarity as well as commemorate it: partly through organized events such as the miners' annual gala, but also through the more humdrum, day‐to‐day culture of the miners. ‘1926’, in turn, became a part of this history, and would go on to dominate the memory and shape the actions of future generations, particularly during the 1984–5 miners' strike.

Keywords: collective memory; Durham Miners' gala; oral history; 1984–5 strike; 1926

Chapter.  12870 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945)

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