Chapter

Fanaticism and Sound Learning

David Bebbington

in Victorian Religious Revivals

Published in print May 2012 | ISBN: 9780199575480
Published online September 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191741449 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199575480.003.0005
Fanaticism and Sound Learning

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A revival among Primitive Methodists in County Durham in 1851 allows an examination of the relationship between emotionalism and self-improvement, both characteristics often attributed to members of the denomination. The Primitive Methodist lead miners of Weardale participated in a lively awakening that was associated with the denominational distinctives of camp meetings, female prominence and entire sanctification. There were influences among them that made for exuberant religious display rather than sober educational attainments. Yet ministers, laypeople and converts showed signs of sound learning. A local preacher, George Race, combined revival enthusiasm with remarkable intellectual achievements.

Keywords: Primitive Methodists; County Durham; emotionalism; self-improvement; lead miners; camp meetings; entire sanctification; George Race

Chapter.  10618 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: History of Christianity

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