Chapter

Jefferson, Madison, and Marshall: The Law of Nations and the New Republic

Mark Weston Janis

in America and the Law of Nations 1776-1939

Published in print February 2010 | ISBN: 9780199579341
Published online May 2010 | e-ISBN: 9780191722653 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199579341.003.0002
 Jefferson, Madison, and Marshall: The Law of Nations and the New Republic

Show Summary Details

Preview

No group of America's leaders has ever been more mindful of the law of nations than were the Founding Fathers. This chapter tells a little of that story. It begins with American perceptions of the law of nations during the Revolution and Confederation (1776-1789), focusing on Thomas Jefferson and the Declaration of Independence. Second, it turns to the importance of the law of nations in the framing of the US Constitution (1787-1789), focusing on James Madison. Third, the chapter explores how the founders relied on international law in early American diplomacy. Finally, it looks to the incorporation of the law of nations in early American judicial practice, particularly the contribution made by John Marshall.

Keywords: law of nations; American Revolution; Confederation; Thomas Jefferson; Declaration of Independence; US Constitution; James Madison; international law; American diplomacy; American law

Chapter.  13077 words. 

Subjects: Public International Law

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.