Chapter

International Law After the Great War

Mark Weston Janis

in America and the Law of Nations 1776-1939

Published in print February 2010 | ISBN: 9780199579341
Published online May 2010 | e-ISBN: 9780191722653 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199579341.003.0011
 International Law After the Great War

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This chapter argues that Wilson's failed project — integrating the United States into the League of Nations — haunted American international lawyers for the two decades 1919-1939. To a considerable extent, the haunting continues to this day. World War I, Wilson, Lodge, and the Versailles Conference all shattered the long-standing American consensus that the law of nations was inherently a good thing. International law became and remains a divisive issue in American politics.

Keywords: international law; law of nations; World War I; Woodrow Wilson

Chapter.  13604 words. 

Subjects: Public International Law

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