Chapter

An emergent European Executive Order and the domestic branch of executive government

Jarle Trondal

in An Emergent European Executive Order

Published in print February 2010 | ISBN: 9780199579426
Published online May 2010 | e-ISBN: 9780191722714 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199579426.003.0012
An emergent European Executive Order and the domestic branch of executive government

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Chapter 12 argues that the differentiated organizational constellation of the European Executive Order contributes to a differentiated penetration of the domestic branch of executive government. It is argued that the Commission mainly activates the lower echelons of domestic government hierarchies, notably professional experts within sector ministries and subordinate agencies. Furthermore, the Commission tends to weaken the domestic politico‐administrative leadership, the Foreign Office, and the Prime Ministers Office. By contrast, the Council of Ministers tends to strengthen the domestic politico‐administrative leadership, the Foreign Office, and the Prime Ministers Office. This chapter offers a comparative analysis of the decision‐making processes within the central administrations of Norway and Sweden. Based on a rich body of survey and interview data, this chapter reveals that multilevel interaction of executive orders—notably the Commission and the Norwegian and Swedish central administrations—occur largely outside the control of the domestic politico‐administrative leadership, the Prime Ministers Office, and the Foreign Office. In Sweden, this tendency is to some extent counterbalanced by the interlocking effect of the Council of Ministers. In sum, executive orders at different levels of government are semi‐open and interpenetrated, but the effects of EU institutions on the domestic branch of executive government are differentiated.

Keywords: Council of Ministers; differentiated Europeanization; domestic branch of executive government; European Commission; Norway; Sweden

Chapter.  5622 words. 

Subjects: Comparative Politics

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