Chapter

Effects of amygdalohippocampectomy versus corticoamygdalohippocampectomy on memory and nonmemory cognitive functions

Sarah J. Banks and Marilyn Jones-Gotman

in Epilepsy and Memory

Published in print June 2012 | ISBN: 9780199580286
Published online September 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191739408 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199580286.003.0024
Effects of amygdalohippocampectomy versus corticoamygdalohippocampectomy on memory and nonmemory cognitive functions

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In recent years, selective resection from medial temporal lobe (TL) structures has become a preferred approach at many centres that offer surgery as a treatment for intractable TL epilepsy. This operation — selective amygdalohippocampectomy (SAH) — differs from the traditional TL surgery (corticoamygdalohippocampectomy; CAH) in that it spares temporal neocortex, which is removed in addition to amygdala and hippocampus in CAH. Because SAH is a smaller resection, it has been expected to cause less cognitive deficit, but as the targeted structures in SAH are critical for memory, this operation could result in important memory deficits. On the other hand, one might expect some sparing of certain nonmemory skills mediated by temporal neocortex. A growing number of studies have attempted to determine whether CAH and SAH differ in cognitive outcome, most focusing on memory outcome. This chapter reviews that literature and present results from investigations on this issue.

Keywords: medial temporal lobe; epilepsy; selective amygdalohippocampectomy; corticoamygdalohippocampectomy

Chapter.  6902 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Neuroscience

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