Chapter

Narrative and History: <i>Tales of Unrest</i> to <i>Lord Jim</i>

Richard Niland

in Conrad and History

Published in print February 2010 | ISBN: 9780199580347
Published online May 2010 | e-ISBN: 9780191722738 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199580347.003.0003

Series: Oxford English Monographs

Narrative and History: Tales of Unrest to Lord Jim

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This chapter explores Conrad's literary style in the early years of his career, detailing how Conrad balanced his Polish literary and philosophical heritage with his new British cultural environment. It investigates Conrad's early short stories and novels in the context of English neo-Hegelian philosophy of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, especially in the context of the work of F.H. Bradley. It also outlines Conrad's connection to Romantic and Victorian traditions of nineteenth century literature represented by William Hazlitt and Thomas Carlyle, examining Conrad's narrative and his representation of time and history up to and including Heart of Darkness and Lord Jim. By focusing on Conrad's interest in various forms of historiography, from oral narratives to seminal Western historians such as Herodotus, the chapter places Conrad's early work in a variety of new historiographical contexts.

Keywords: Neo-Hegelian; Hazlitt; Carlyle; Bradley; Heart of Darkness; Lord Jim; historiography; Herodotus; romantic; Victorian

Chapter.  14596 words. 

Subjects: Literary Studies (20th Century onwards)

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