Chapter

The International Court of Justice and the International Criminal Court in Historical Context

Ruth MacKenzie, Kate Malleson, Penny Martin and Philippe Sands

in Selecting International Judges: Principle, Process, and Politics

Published in print July 2010 | ISBN: 9780199580569
Published online September 2010 | e-ISBN: 9780191594489 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199580569.003.0002

Series: International Courts and Tribunals Series

The International Court of Justice and the International Criminal Court in Historical Context

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The design and operation of international judicial selection processes over the last century have taken place in the context of the ad hoc emergence of international courts and tribunals. There are no principles or rules of general application governing the selection of judges at international level and there has been no clear elaboration of any one particular model of judicial selection. Different processes have developed for each court, arising from the particular circumstances in which it was established, and states have developed a heterogeneous set of models borrowed and adapted from one court to another. This chapter traces the key stages in the emergence of the various international judicial selection processes of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) and the International Criminal Court (ICC).

Keywords: judges; international courts; International Court of Justice; International Criminal Court; judicial selection; ad hoc arbitration

Chapter.  8888 words. 

Subjects: Public International Law

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