Chapter

Conclusions

Ruth MacKenzie, Kate Malleson, Penny Martin and Philippe Sands

in Selecting International Judges: Principle, Process, and Politics

Published in print July 2010 | ISBN: 9780199580569
Published online September 2010 | e-ISBN: 9780191594489 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199580569.003.0007

Series: International Courts and Tribunals Series

Conclusions

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The findings from this study present a mixed picture. On a number of issues there was a degree of consensus amongst those interviewed. In other areas, there were some sharp divergences of views, both in terms of factual understanding about the way the judicial selection processes currently function and about how they ought to work. Such disparate opinions are in themselves revealing of the lack of transparency and common standards in the processes examined. This chapter discusses the recurrent themes that emerged out of these various perspectives. Some of these relate specifically to the ICJ and the ICC; others shed light on wider issues in the selection processes of the international courts more generally.

Keywords: judges; international courts; International Court of Justice; International Criminal; judicial selection

Chapter.  3483 words. 

Subjects: Public International Law

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