Chapter

Professional Integrity

Richard Abel

in Law and Anthropology

Published in print November 2009 | ISBN: 9780199580910
Published online February 2010 | e-ISBN: 9780191723025 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199580910.003.0017

Series: Current Legal Issues

 Professional Integrity

Show Summary Details

Preview

Many professions displayed indifference to or complicity with the Bush administration's abuses. Many of the few professionals who resisted did so individually or in marginalized groups, moved by political commitments or ethical beliefs acquired outside the profession. Most government officials — especially those in the military — voiced objections only after retiring. Yet in light of the passivity of the rest of civil society — political parties (i.e. Democrats), trade unions, organized religion, voluntary associations, identity groupings, students and youth, and mass movements — the principled actions of a few professions or professionals acquire greater significance. This chapter describes some of their actions in order to draw tentative lessons about the potential of professional integrity. It focuses on four classic professions: divinity, medicine, law, and the military.

Keywords: rule of law; professional integrity; professionals

Chapter.  16961 words. 

Subjects: Comparative Law

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.