Chapter

Individual Representationalism in the Twentieth Century's First Half

Tyler Burge

in Origins of Objectivity

Published in print March 2010 | ISBN: 9780199581405
Published online May 2010 | e-ISBN: 9780191723223 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199581405.003.0004
Individual Representationalism in the Twentieth Century's First Half

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Chapter 1 described two families of Individual Representationalism. Both hold that objective representation of entities in the physical environment constitutively depends on the individual's representation of preconditions for objectivity. First-family views maintain that representation of particulars in the physical environment depends on prior representation of other sorts of particulars. Second-family views maintain that representing general preconditions for objectivity are necessary for the possibility, indeed often intelligibility, of representation of environmental entities. This chapter focuses on first-family views that dominated the first half of the 20th century.

Keywords: individual representationalism; psychology; philosophy

Chapter.  12155 words. 

Subjects: Philosophy of Mind

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