Chapter

Christa Wolf

Lorna Hardwick and James I. Porter

in Sibylline Sisters

Published in print September 2011 | ISBN: 9780199582969
Published online January 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191731198 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199582969.003.0008

Series: Classical Presences

Christa Wolf

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Christa Wolf's Kassandra (1983) is, perhaps, the 20th century's most acclaimed female response to and rewriting of an ancient epic. As an East German woman writer whose work was subject to the censorship of the authorities in her own country, at a time when Europe appeared to be lurching towards the death throes threatened by the cold war, Wolf was particularly moved by the figure of the Trojan princess who was doomed never to be heeded as she uttered the terrible prophecies about the downfall of her homeland. Much has been written about the way in which Wolf breathes life into the shadowy form of Cassandra, whom she resuscitates from the Iliad and from Aeschylus' Oresteia.

Keywords: Virgil; women writers; Kassandra; epic; Iliad; Oresteia

Chapter.  10847 words. 

Subjects: Classical Literature

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