Chapter

The ‘Renowned Man of Letters’

Tracey A. Sowerby

in Renaissance and Reform in Tudor England

Published in print April 2010 | ISBN: 9780199584635
Published online May 2010 | e-ISBN: 9780191723162 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199584635.003.0009

Series: Oxford Historical Monographs

The ‘Renowned Man of Letters’

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This chapter returns to the theme of Morison's scholarly interests and briefly examines his international reputation as a humanist of some note. The main focus is Morison's collection of books. At over four hundred Greek and Latin volumes, it was one of the largest and most eclectic private collections of books in England at this time. The main themes and areas represented in the library—theology, history, language, philosophy, medicine, Greek—are analysed. The chapter also discusses the communal aspect of Morison's library; friends borrowed printed books and manuscripts on a regular basis, making Morison and his library of significance for our understanding of Tudor humanism more broadly.

Keywords: humanism; book ownership; theology; history; Greek

Chapter.  5642 words. 

Subjects: Early Modern History (1500 to 1700)

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