Chapter

Complicating the Story: Religion and Gender in Historical Writing on British and American Anti-Slavery

David Turley

in Women, Dissent, and Anti-Slavery in Britain and America, 1790–1865

Published in print April 2011 | ISBN: 9780199585489
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191728969 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199585489.003.0002
Complicating the Story: Religion and Gender in Historical Writing on British and American Anti-Slavery

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This chapter traces historical writing on British and American anti-slavery through three phases encompassing writing by participants, the generations of twentieth century professional historians (including a distinct tradition of African American writing) and, most substantially, the period from the 1970s displaying the impact of the development of feminism on historical writing. It treats the themes of religion and gender both separately and together, especially in the section on feminism, as religion is represented as a major mode through which women moderated their engagement with anti-slavery. The Chapter notes both similarities and differences in the historiographical significance given to gender in relation to religion: British scholars focusing on the importance of class formation; Americans on race and female culture.

Keywords: historical writing; anti-slavery; religion; gender; class; race; female culture; feminism; African American writing

Chapter.  11200 words. 

Subjects: Christianity

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