Chapter

Classification in a Christian Empire

Philip Wood

in ‘We have no king but Christ’

Published in print December 2010 | ISBN: 9780199588497
Published online January 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191595424 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199588497.003.0002

Series: Oxford Studies in Byzantium

Classification in a Christian Empire

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This chapter examines fifth‐century ecclesiastical historians as evidence for the Christianisation of Roman politicatl ideas. These historians used heresiology as an extension of classical ethnography. For them, heretics, like barbarians, were irrational and divided. These ideas changed the rules for inclusion and exclusion in the empire: now that being orthodox was equated to being Roman; ‘provincial peoples’ could claim civilised virtues, such as self‐control, that had formerly been the preserve ofan educated elite.

Keywords: Ecclesiastical histories; orthodoxy; Self‐control; Heresiology; Improvement

Chapter.  6488 words. 

Subjects: Classical History

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