Chapter

Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea—An Unfinished Journey: Some very Preliminary Thoughts on Pirates and Other Pernicious People

Daniel-Erasmus Khan

in From Bilateralism to Community Interest

Published in print March 2011 | ISBN: 9780199588817
Published online May 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191725272 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199588817.003.0074
Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea—An Unfinished Journey: Some very Preliminary Thoughts on Pirates and Other Pernicious People

Show Summary Details

Preview

The phenomenon of maritime piracy has terrorized the seas since time immemorial. The number of attacks worldwide having increased more than tenfold in the past two decades, the pirate menace has always constituted a challenge not only for seafaring nations, indiscriminately exposed to the peril of being set upon by these ‘pernicious people’. Rather, as long as the oceans have been plied for commerce, it has affected all those who benefit from seafaring — so, virtually the international community as a whole. Hence, from this perspective good reasons may indeed exist for pirates to be labelled ‘Hostis Humani Generis’ (enemies of mankind), a concept credited to the Roman lawyer, statesman, and political theorist Marcus Tullius Cicero.

Keywords: maritime piracy; pirates; international law; seafaring; Hostis Humani Generis

Chapter.  10442 words. 

Subjects: Public International Law

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.