Chapter

Dissidence and Subversion: Gallic, Jewish, and Other Lunar Calendars in the Roman Empire

Sacha Stern

in Calendars in Antiquity

Published in print September 2012 | ISBN: 9780199589449
Published online September 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191746178 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199589449.003.0007
Dissidence and Subversion: Gallic, Jewish, and Other Lunar Calendars in the Roman Empire

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This chapter examines how lunar calendars that survived unofficially within the Roman Empire could be used to express subtle political dissidence. These include the Gallic calendar of Coligny, luna dates in Italian inscriptions and parapegmata, emerging lunar calendar schemes in third–fourth-centuries Rome (e.g., in Christian Easter cycles and in the codex of Philocalus), and a variety of Jewish calendars in Palestine and the Diaspora. These calendars and dating schemes increasingly adopted elements of the dominant Julian calendar, whilst asserting their dissident identity by remaining lunar. They were reflections, in their hybridity, of complex political situations and processes involving subversion, dissidence, and common sub-cultures, which are best interpreted in the light of post-colonial theory.

Keywords: calendar; lunar; Gallic; inscriptions; parapegmata; Easter cycles; Jewish; dissidence; subversion; post-colonial theory

Chapter.  30673 words. 

Subjects: Classical History

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