Chapter

Tory Sensibilities Old and New: <i>The Perils of False Brethren</i> and <i>Passive Obedience</i>

Toni Bowers

in Force or Fraud

Published in print January 2011 | ISBN: 9780199592135
Published online May 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191725340 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199592135.003.0006
Tory Sensibilities Old and New: The Perils of False Brethren and Passive Obedience

More Like This

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Literary Studies (1500 to 1800)

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Chapter 5 marks a transitional moment early in the eighteenth century, when old‐ and new‐tory‐oriented discourses came into conflict around the doctrine of passive obedience and non‐resistance. It offers close readings of Henry Sacheverell's The Perils of False Brethren (1705, 1709) and George Berkeley's Passive Obedience (1712). Sacheverell's sermon on the requirement of non‐resistance was so incendiary that it led to his arrest and trial, accompanied by prolonged rioting in London. Berkeley's text constituted an effort to tamp down and distance toryism from Sacheverellian excess. Sacheverell articulated strongly old‐tory ideals; Berkeley insisted that obedience was due to the law and the de facto monarch, not the lineally descended heir, a crucial revision and a significant shift in tory ideological sensibility. Together, the two sermons delineate subtle but historically powerful differences in tory‐oriented thinking, self‐definition, and rhetoric before and after the so-called “Glorious Revolution”.

Keywords: old‐tory; new‐tory; passive obedience and non‐resistance; George Berkeley, Passive Obedience, or The Christian Doctrine of Not Resisting the Supream Power (1712); Henry Sacheverell, The Perils of False Brethren, both in Church, and State (1705, 1709); rioting; trial; tory‐oriented; Tory party proscription; “varieties of ideological sensibility”; sermon

Chapter.  10100 words. 

Subjects: Literary Studies (1500 to 1800)

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.