Chapter

They Lived and Saved: Examining the Savings Motives of Shopkeepers in Late Nineteenth-Century Britain

Mary Beth Combs

in Men, Women, and Money

Published in print April 2011 | ISBN: 9780199593767
Published online September 2011 | e-ISBN: 9780191728815 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199593767.003.0004
They Lived and Saved: Examining the Savings Motives of Shopkeepers in Late Nineteenth-Century Britain

Show Summary Details

Preview

The chapter examines the saving and investment decisions of nineteenth-century British shopkeepers using data on 332 census-linked probated decedents dying between 1859 and 1891. Previous research indicates that the nineteenth-century US agricultural sector experienced a transition from bequest saving to life-cycle saving. The chapter tests the potential impact of bequest, life-cycle, and deferred compensation motives on wealth-holding to determine whether late nineteenth-century British shopkeepers reached the transition stage between bequest and/or deferred compensation to life-cycle saving, as shown by Roger Ransom and Richard Sutch for the case of the US agricultural sector. The results reveal evidence of an altruistic bequest motive.

Keywords: wealth-holding; bequest saving; life-cycle saving; Britain; shopkeepers; nineteenth century

Chapter.  9489 words. 

Subjects: Business History

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.