Chapter

Panics, Peace, and Pacifism: Official Soviet Diplomatic Identity in the late-Stalin years 1945–53<sup>1</sup>

Timothy Johnston

in Being Soviet

Published in print August 2011 | ISBN: 9780199604036
Published online January 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191731600 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199604036.003.0004

Series: Oxford Historical Monographs

Panics, Peace, and Pacifism: Official Soviet Diplomatic Identity in the late-Stalin years 1945–531

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The official post-war diplomatic identity of the USSR continued to stress the strength of the great power alliance until the autumn of 1947. However, the population of the Soviet Union was not convinced and a series of war rumours and war panics broke out in the early post-war months. From late-1947, the Soviet press stressed above all the peace-loving nature of the USSR and its role as a defender of the oppressed, particularly in East Asia. The late-Stalinist campaigns for peace after 1948 were unusually successful in their attempts to mobilize the population of the USSR. Their success was a product of ongoing war anxiety but also the creative reappropriation of the campaigns into a platform through which participants could speak about the suffering they had experienced in the recent conflict. This behaviour offers an insight into certain aspects of the Soviet early Cold War mentalité

Keywords: 1945; 1953; post-war Stalinism; late Stalinism; war rumours; panic; Peace Campaigns; Struggle for Peace; mentalité

Chapter.  16030 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945)

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