Chapter

Afterword: Herrick's Community, the Babylonian Captivity, and the Uses of Historicism

Achsah Guibbory

in ‘Lords of Wine and Oile’

Published in print September 2011 | ISBN: 9780199604777
Published online January 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191729355 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199604777.003.0013
Afterword: Herrick's Community, the Babylonian Captivity, and the Uses of Historicism

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This chapter analyses how poetry for Herrick and many other royalists connected to the Caroline court is political, not in the limited sense of power relations but in the sense of being concerned with public life and affairs, with the body politic and the social body as well as the individual. It involves a moral stance. The continuing vitality of historicist criticism for reading Herrick’s poetry is made clear and it is argued here that if this is combined with a sophisticated, complex understanding of the structures of religious belief, structures which express ideas about human nature, imagination and art and the relationship of the past to the present, the resonance of Herrick’s printed poetry for a defeated and dispersed royalist Anglican community becomes clear.

Keywords: Herrick; historicism; formalism; postmodernism; Psalm 137; Judah; destruction of Jerusalem; Civil War; exile; Anglican identity

Chapter.  6495 words. 

Subjects: Literary Studies (1500 to 1800)

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