Chapter

Justifications for Consultation

Mark Hall and John Purcell

in Consultation at Work

Published in print October 2012 | ISBN: 9780199605460
Published online January 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780191746062 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199605460.003.0002
Justifications for Consultation

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The different terms used to describe the practice of consultation, for example participation, industrial democracy, involvement, are assessed. Justifications for consultation vary. There are six principal means by which consultation is said to enhance organizational efficiency: giving employees access to top management, improving the quality of decisions, contributing to the management of change, inculcating a participative management style, providing a means to deal with problems, and improving employee commitment. This is the dominant rationale in the twenty-first century. A very different view, now less often heard, sees consultation as a form of power-sharing. Consultation can also be justified as an employee right in itself as seen in efforts by the EU to promote consultation and by many commentators.

Keywords: participation; industrial democracy; involvement; justifications; efficiency; power-sharing; right

Chapter.  8765 words. 

Subjects: Human Resource Management

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