Chapter

Hyperactivity and hypersynchrony in neural networks as substrates for tinnitus?

Jos J. Eggermont

in The Neuroscience of Tinnitus

Published in print May 2012 | ISBN: 9780199605606
Published online September 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191741555 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199605606.003.0011
Hyperactivity and hypersynchrony in neural networks as substrates for tinnitus?

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The scenario of hyperactivity and hypersynchrony suggests that central gain change alone can account for both hyperacusis and tinnitus. The finding that in patients with a primary complaint of hyperacusis the prevalence of tinnitus is about 86% supports this. However in patients attending tinnitus clinics with a primary complaint of tinnitus the prevalence of hyperacusis is only about 40%. This suggests a strong link with hyperacusis only for a particular subset of tinnitus patients and it is tempting to suggest that in that group hyperacusis is causal to the tinnitus. More detailed typing of tinnitus etiology is obviously needed to find the reasons why there are so many more patients with tinnitus without accompanying hyperacusis.

Keywords: neurotransmitters; homeostatic mechanism; immediate early genes; top-down mechanisms; neural feedback; resting brain correlations; imagery; epilepsy; limbic system; stress

Chapter.  9872 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Neuroscience

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