Chapter

Reviewing Security Council Measures in the Light of International Human Rights Principles

Salvatore Zappalà

in Securing Human Rights?

Published in print October 2011 | ISBN: 9780199641499
Published online January 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191732218 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199641499.003.0007

Series: Collected Courses of the Academy of European Law

Reviewing Security Council Measures in the Light of International Human Rights Principles

Show Summary Details

Preview

This chapter presents a critical account of the Security Council's involvement in human rights matters since the early 1990s from a legal perspective. The Council has often operated outside the original framework of the UN Charter, taking measures not provided for in the text of the Charter and probably not even anticipated by its drafters. It is argued that the action of the Council has produced positive effects for human rights when the Council limited itself to measures of a general character and the establishment of autonomous bodies (such as the ad hoc criminal tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda) able to balance contradictory interests in specific cases. On the other hand, action of the Council directly interfering with individual rights, as in the case of targeted sanctions, is likely to have resulted in violations of human rights.

Keywords: Security Council; human rights; United Nations Charter; international peace and security; targeted sanctions; former Yugoslavia; Rwanda

Chapter.  12462 words. 

Subjects: Public International Law

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.