Chapter

Conclusion

Milette Gaifman

in Aniconism in Greek Antiquity

Published in print May 2012 | ISBN: 9780199645787
Published online September 2012 | e-ISBN: 9780191741623 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199645787.003.0009

Series: Oxford Studies in Ancient Culture & Representation

Conclusion

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This chapter suggests that the scholarly placement of aniconism on the peripheries of mainstream Greek cult practices and visual culture is not unwarranted by the evidence we have seen. Although they sit on the sidelines, aniconic stelai and stones and a variety of other forms of aniconism resist being brushed aside as insignificant. Instead, they declare their role as markers of temporal, spatial, and social boundaries in art, religion, and visual culture from the rise of the Greek polis to the centuries when Greeks were under Roman rule.

Keywords: Greek aniconism; Greek cult practices; visual culture; aniconic stelai; stones

Chapter.  3786 words. 

Subjects: Greek and Roman Archaeology

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