Chapter

Scripture, Tradition, and Revelation: An Appreciative Critique of David Brown

William J. Abraham

in Theology, Aesthetics, and Culture

Published in print September 2012 | ISBN: 9780199646821
Published online January 2013 | e-ISBN: 9780191744853 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199646821.003.0002
Scripture, Tradition, and Revelation: An Appreciative Critique of David Brown

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This chapter provides an exposition and critical review of David Brown's Tradition and Imagination: Revelation and Change. The central thesis advanced by Brown is that tradition (Christian and non-Christian) should be construed in terms of divine revelation. The tacit premise behind this move is an inductive description of the bible as divine revelation; given that a similar description can be given of tradition, it should also be seen in terms of divine revelation. The latter half of the chapter provides an appreciative assessment of this novel move. Brown's work is nothing short of brilliant in its depth and ingenuity. However, it remains captive to a misleading vision of scripture, even as it opens up the possibility of securing a more liberating vision of scripture, revelation, and tradition within a better vision of the epistemology of theology.

Keywords: David Brown; tradition; revelation; the epistemology of theology; scripture; Anglican theology

Chapter.  7825 words. 

Subjects: Christian Theology

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